10 Points of Proper Shoe Fit

  1. Have your feet measured.  People’s foot size and shape can change over time.
  2.  Most people have one foot that is larger than the other, so make sure you have BOTH feet measured. Fit your shoes to the larger foot.
  3. Just like clothes, the size marked inside the shoe may be different depending on the brand. So your shoe size is a just a starting point in selecting the correct shoe.
  4. Select a shoe that is shaped like your foot.
  5. Stand up and make sure there is 3/8″ or 1/2″ (about the width of your finger) between your longest toe (usually the second toe) and the end of the shoe.
  6. The ball of your foot (the widest part just before your toes begin) should fit comfortably in the widest part of the shoe.
  7. Don’t plan on shoes stretching over time; they should fit well when you buy them.
  8.  The shoe should also have enough depth to fit your toes, especially if you have hammertoes or other conditions. Shoes with too small of a toe box will cause rubbing and you will get calluses or sores.
  9.  Always stand and walk around in the shoes to see if they are comfortable, fit well, and don’t chafe or rub anywhere. Your heel should not slip or slide while walking.
  10. Shoes made of leather can reduce the possibility of skin irritations. Soles should provide solid footing and not be slippery. Thick soles cushion your feet when walking on hard surfaces. Low-heeled shoes are more comfortable, safer, and less damaging than high-heeled shoes.

Courtesy: aofas.org

 

Which Running Shoe is Right for You?

One of the first steps to healthy running is wearing supportive running shoes. Neglecting to wear proper footwear can lead to a variety of foot problems that can cause injury and impede performance.

Feet are generally categorized into three types: low/flat arch, normal arch, and high arch. Look below to see which type of running shoe fits your foot type:
Feet with low archesFeet with high archesFeet with normal arches

1. For feet with low arches: Choose a supportive shoe that is designed for stability and motion control. These shoes help to correct for overpronation.
2. For feet with normal arches: Choose a shoe with equal amounts of stability and cushioning to help absorb shock.
3. For feet with high arches: Choose a cushioned running shoe with a softer midsole and more flexibility. This will compensate for the poor shock absorption of a high-arched foot.

Copyright 2016 APMA